Living with our genes

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you.

Living with our genes

Living with our genes

Fate"] Darwin and Freud walk into a bar. Two alcoholic mice — a mother and her son — sit on two bar stools, lapping gin from two thimbles.

For over a hundred years, those two views — nature or nurture, biology or psychology — offered opposing explanations for how behaviors develop and persist, not only within a single individual but across generations.

Moshe Szyf, a molecular biologist and geneticist at McGill University in Montreal, had never studied psychology or neurology, but he had been talked into attending by a colleague who thought his work might have some application.

Moshe can drink beer anywhere. So it was perfect. One such extra element is the methyl group, a common structural component of organic molecules.

Originally these epigenetic changes were believed to occur only during fetal development. But pioneering studies showed that molecular bric-a-brac could be added to DNA in adulthood, setting off a cascade of cellular changes resulting in cancer.

Sometimes methyl groups attached to DNA thanks to changes in diet; other times, exposure to certain chemicals appeared to be the cause. Szyf showed that correcting epigenetic changes with drugs could cure certain cancers in animals.

Geneticists were especially surprised to find that epigenetic change could be passed down from parent to child, one generation after the next. A study from Randy Jirtle of Duke University showed that when female mice are fed a diet rich in methyl groups, the fur pigment of subsequent offspring is permanently altered.

Without any change to DNA at all, methyl groups could be added or subtracted, and the changes were inherited much like a mutation in a gene. Moshe Szyf, molecular biologist and geneticist. McGill University Now, at the bar in Madrid, Szyf and Meaney considered a hypothesis as improbable as it was profound: That question turned out to be the basis of a new field, behavioral epigenetics, now so vibrant it has spawned dozens of studies and suggested profound new treatments to heal the brain.

Jews whose great-grandparents were chased from their Russian shtetls; Chinese whose grandparents lived through the ravages of the Cultural Revolution; young immigrants from Africa whose parents survived massacres; adults of every ethnicity who grew up with alcoholic or abusive parents — all carry with them more than just memories.

Like silt deposited on the cogs of a finely tuned machine after the seawater of a tsunami recedes, our experiences, and those of our forebears, are never gone, even if they have been forgotten.

They become a part of us, a molecular residue holding fast to our genetic scaffolding. The DNA remains the same, but psychological and behavioral tendencies are inherited. If your grandmother was adopted by nurturing parents, you might be enjoying the boost she received thanks to their love and support.

Living with Our Genes

The mechanisms of behavioral epigenetics underlie not only deficits and weaknesses but strengths and resiliencies, too. And for those unlucky enough to descend from miserable or withholding grandparents, emerging drug treatments could reset not just mood, but the epigenetic changes themselves.

Shake it hard enough, and you can wipe clean the family curse. A January storm has deposited half a foot of snow outside the picture windows lining his fourth-floor corner office at the Douglas Institute, a mental health affiliate of McGill.

He has the rugged good looks and tousled salt-and-pepper hair of someone found on a ski slope — precisely where he plans to go this weekend. On the floor lies an arrangement of helium balloons in various stages of deflation.

What produces that variation? Evolution selects the variance that is most successful, but what produces the grist for the mill? Research dating back to the s had shown that rats handled by humans for as little as five to 15 minutes per day during their first three weeks of life grew up to be calmer and less reactive to stressful environments compared with their non-handled littermates.

Seeking to tease out the mechanism behind such an enduring effect, Meaney and others established that the benefit was not actually conveyed by the human handling. In a landmark paper in Science, he showed that natural variations in the amount of licking and grooming received during infancy had a direct effect on how stress hormones, including corticosterone, were expressed in adulthood.Sep 18,  · In a study published Tuesday in PLOS Biology, researchers at Northwestern University reported that of our 20, protein-coding genes, about 5, have never been the .

Jul 14,  · Our DNA is amazingly complex and dynamic, with gene expression constantly turning on or off as a direct response to the myriad of biochemical signals that are received from the body.

As genes . In a light, breezy style, Hamer, a biologist at the National Cancer Institute, and Copeland attempt to explain the extent to which our genes control our lives.

Expertise. Insights. Illumination.

Jan 01,  · More important than our collection of genes, it now appears, is how those genes are controlled by both internal and external factors--our thoughts, stress, social connections, what we eat, our.

The first year was spent getting our bearings and trying to process what we had learned. This past year really has become more about learning how to manage our new reality. I’d like to share the top 5 things I’ve learned over the past year about living with a rare disease.

LOG: Living with Our Genes study guide by auomaik includes 78 questions covering vocabulary, terms and more. Quizlet flashcards, activities and games help you improve your grades.

Gene - Wikipedia